Why are you not stocking craft beer yet?

Craft beer is a movement that hasn’t stopped. But despite

the UK’s beer heritage, an official definition of craft beer is yet to exist. The US Brewers’ Association defines a craft brewery as small, independent and traditional yet innovative – aiming to keep brewer’s focused on quality ingredients but open to new ideas.

Sound familiar? Isn’t part of your business success story to stock the best ingredients for your store and to learn along the way?

Microbreweries and quirky labels may seem like they’re popping up in every pub or off-licence, but according to the United Craft Brewers they account for less than 1% of the UK beer market. Admittedly, they do have a long way to go but with Tesco and Aldi announcing earlier this month that they’re brewing own-label craft beer – isn’t it time that you show them that they’re doing it wrong?

craft beer Tesco’s own brand craft ale

These retail giants hardly match the craft beer definition: small, independent, traditional yet innovative. But you do, and by stocking craft beer you’re not just stocking a fad, you’re supporting another reputable local business and beating multiples in a market they can’t match.

Attributed to exporting food trends internationally, America is celebrating another successful year in craft beer. The number of craft breweries has risen by 125% since 2008 – from 1,521 to 3,481. Craft brewers now have an 11% share of the beer market in America – the first time small and independent brewers have obtained a double-digit figure.

Infographic: 2014 Was Another Great Year For U.S. Craft Beer | Statista

Similar to rise of the convenience sector, craft beer is a success story in Britain. According to the Cask Report, there are nearly 1,500 cask breweries in Britain and the industry is now worth £1.7bn – up 23% since 2010 and it’s likely to keep rising. But the key figure is that five in every six pints of beer are not served in pubs.

Now, isn’t it time you stocked craft beer?