The factshouse

  • Name: Harj Gill
  • Shop: Select & Save – The Windmill
  • Location: Rubery, Birmingham
  • Size: 2,700sq ft
  • Staff: 7 full time

Harj Gill invited Susan Nash and John Muir of Mondelez International and the IAA’s Nick Shanagher to advise how to improve his in-store display.

Harj’s Challenge:

I know that we run a good shop but I want to be able to inspire customers to spend more.

Harj says:

I always like to take ideas on board. While I know my own shop and my customers well, I have looked at what other shops have been doing with great in-store theatre. With my brother, we discussed that this is something that we need to do better to take the shop to the next level. Getting feedback from the IAA will help with our thinking.

IAA advice:

1. Co-ordinate displays with supplier promotions

Susan and John are impressed by the excellent product selection and merchandising across the store. “But it needs a ‘wow’ factor,” says Susan. Visiting just before Easter, there is a full display of eggs but no themed point of sale. Harj agrees to source more point of sale from the supply chain. It is available from Nisa, from cash and carries, and from manufacturers direct. “Pictures tell stories,” Susan says, “and create an emotional response in shoppers.” Susan also suggests that clip-on units for confectionery on the magazine racks could encourage extra purchases and John will source some for Harj to use.

Action: Maximise impact by asking for point-of-sale from suppliers when buying promotional stock.

2. Highlighting specialist and local products

Almost every product in The Windmill has a shelf label but they all look the same and don’t explain what’s special about them. Reviewing the chilled lunchtime snacks, there is a good mix of branded and local products. But there is no call to action such as top seller or local supplier. Susan suggests that Harj has a special sign for all products sourced from within 25 miles, including ready meals. The fruit and vegetable display could also benefit from chalkboard signs and wicker baskets. Harj agrees to research these and visit two local shops that John says do this well for inspiration. As his brother does the wine buying, for example, Harj will discuss with him how to put a spotlight on the best deals.

Action: Source special point-of-sale signs and trays to tempt purchases of fresh and local products.

3. Create inspirational displays in high traffic areas

For a large shop there is not much room at the front to grab shoppers’ attention. Moving a photocopier to the back of the shop could free up floor space for free standing units and stacks of product on promotion. Flicking through the Retail Profit Guide, Susan shows a number of good ideas that Harj could copy. Harj says he is looking into upgrading his coffee offer too. Two dump bins selling off short dated stock take up prime selling space. It is suggested that Harj should check the numbers and see if putting new products and big promotions here would grow sales. In addition, Harj should consider displaying some fruit to signpost his fresh offering in store.

Action: Rethink the area by the counter to accommodate displays that will grab a shopper’s attention

Partner advice:

Susan Nash & John Muir, Trade Communication Manager & Sales Development Executive, Mondelez International

“It’s clear Harj is running a good shop and is keen to improve. What he is not doing is inspiring shoppers to try something new or pick up an extra item. The front of the shop is a key selling area and with a few small changes could be better used to connect with customers.”

 

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Your action plan:

  • Go to betterretailing.com/IAA to download the free tools to improve your shop
  • Call 020 7689 0600 (Option 3) to find out how you can take part in a future visit from one of our partners
  • To benchmark your shop, download your free digital copy of the IAA’s Retail Profit Guide.

Our retail toolkit is packed with useful tools and resources to help you grow your sales and profits, including the Retail Profit Guide.