I thought long and hard about the subject for this leader. But then I read the 103 comments made within 24 hours on the PayPoint Pay Fair Facebook group and heard about the 2,100 views on a PayPoint post on a Premier retailer forum. This convinced me there is one issue still dominating retailers’ thoughts.

Despite the enormous hype online, there is an eerie silence from those who can change things. New business secretary Sajid Javid and small business minister Anna Soubry refused RN’s request to comment before next Wednesday’s Queen’s Speech.

RN asked the big six energy suppliers and BBC TV Licensing if they thought it was acceptable that retailers should make a loss while subsidising their profitability. Predictably, they weren’t going to bite the hand that feeds them.

PayPoint, meanwhile, after a week of turmoil in which its managing and retail directors were ushered out the back door, has been quietly picking off retailers charging handling fees or insisting on additional purchases.

Retailer fear and apathy appears to have stopped the social media storm loosening PayPoint’s grip on its network – and profits. But a head of sales at one of our industry’s biggest suppliers told me last week he thinks the service provider’s strategy is fraught with failures and could be the end of the company.

[pull_quote_right]Fear and apathy appears to have stopped the social media storm loosening PayPoint’s grip on its network – and profits[/pull_quote_right]

Retailer Marcus Bergin spearheaded the fight because he couldn’t support his partner, four children and member of staff while making a loss processing PayPoint transactions. The thought of the collective loss made by the entire retail trade is keeping his fight going.

For 126 years, RN has been the campaigning voice for local businesses to provide great service to their communities and make a profit. Their supply chain must support them in this.