We live, at the moment, in a world that is shattered and divided, on a knife-edge of opinion and debate.

Nowhere is this more true than in the world of wine. How so, you might ask. Because, dear retailer reader, you’re only months away from a world in which you might be able to sell wine in cans.

Yes, cans. Forget the purists arguing the benefits of cork and screw cap, soon they will be arguing over glass or can.

Who wants to carry 750ml bottles when you can grab cans? There’s no need for the corkscrew or the glass, there is less risk in transit

A Portland-based company introduced them in 2013, and the ‘Mancan’ (wine, in a can, for a man…) gathered press in November last year, but it’s now reached the stage where lifestyle blogs in America are able to throw out ‘8 Canned Wines That Will Make You A Convert’ articles without even blinking.

Barefoot Wines launched a canned spritzer earlier this year, and Whole Foods put canned wine alongside dehydrated foods and catfish on a list of expected trends this year.

According to Nielsen, sales of canned wine grew 125% last year. Canned wine racked up $6.4m in sales in the US up to the middle of June.

This might not be a fad. It follows the huge growth of canned craft beers, currently filling up convenience store shelves around the UK. And like craft beers, it is also proving popular with that hard-to-define, easy-to-deride ‘millennial’ buying group.

Who wants to carry 750ml bottles when you can grab cans? There’s no need for the corkscrew or the glass, there is less risk in transit. Although portion-sized bottles are available, the can is a format that might give wine a 21st century boost.

On-the-go eating and drinking and convenient portion sizes are growing trends in small stores, and this ticks both of those boxes. Adventurous retailers can start exploring it by ordering cases online. I’d be very interested to hear your views and whether this might be something you’d explore.

It’s summer, it’s time to experiment, to attract and entertain your customers. Forget the purists and think about the theatre – and the sales.