Retail Crimewatch

Retailers are urging the public to #ShopKind when they visit the high street this Christmas, after new polling revealed that 38% of shoppers have witnessed violence and abuse against shop workers.

In the run up to Christmas, retailers, the Home Office and charity Crimestoppers are reminding customers to be kind to shop workers.

The latest retail industry data suggests that 450 shop workers are abused each day, with fears this may rise during the busy festive season.

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The #ShopKind campaign urges the public to be mindful of retail works essential role serving the public. Over 86% of shoppers recognise that shop workers face a much higher workload during the Christmas period, but there remains a minority of people that are aggressive and physical towards retail workers.

Minister for policing, Kit Malthouse MP has backed the #ShopKind campaign claiming it, “provides better support to retail workers and encourage customers to treat them with dignity.

“I fully support the #ShopKind campaign, which reminds customers to shop with kindness. I would encourage all retailers to continue to show their support for the campaign and use the seasonal #ShopKind assets”, he added.

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The new campaign has received open support by major high street retailers as well as the ACS and the shop workers’ union Usdaw.

Mark Hallas, chief executive at charity Crimestoppers, said, “There is absolutely no excuse for violent or abusive behaviour towards works. Please help us stamp out abuse and if you know who is responsible but want to stay anonymous, tell our charity what you know.”

If you have any information about someone who is abusive or violent towards retail workers, please let Crimestoppers know 100% anonymously on freephone 0800 555 111 or by competing a simple and secure Anonymous Online Form at www.crimestoppers-uk.org.

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