Industry figures are calling for new Prime Minister Theresa May to take “immediate action” to ensure small businesses are looked after following the Brexit vote.

Mike Cherry, national chairman at the Federation of Small Businesses, said that business owners were looking to the Government for stability.

“The Government must act decisively to secure our long-term economic stability after the decision to leave the EU,” he said.

“Immediate action is needed to improve small business confidence and allow them to reliably plan ahead for the future.”

Cherry said there were specific areas the federation expected May to maintain even after Britain leaves the EU.

“[During] EU negotiations, she must ensure that smaller firms’ interests are taken into account,” he said. “[These include] simple access to the single market, continued funding for key schemes and clarity on future regulatory framework.”

James Lowman, chief executive of the ACS, said that May’s newly-formed Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy needed to take action on retail energy contracts.

“There are significant issues with energy contracts for retailers, especially when it comes to the activity of energy brokers,” he said.

“We are calling for the energy broker market to be regulated by a robust code of practice, and for Ofgem and the new Business and Energy Department to work together to take action as soon as possible to make this happen.”

What does Theresa May stand for?
Theresa May is the UK’s new Prime Minister, pledging to “make Britain a country that works for every one of us” – but do her beliefs align with the convenience sector’s?
In the past, May has voted:

 

For increased rates of duty on alcohol
For giving local government powers to vary restrictions on large shops’ Sunday hours
For devolving a proportion of business rates to local councils
For introducing Police and Crime Commissioners
For plain packaging on cigarettes
Against automatic enrolment pensions

Photograph: UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor